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Photofrin prices near Beaumont, TX

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What is Photofrin?

What is this medicine? PORFIMER is a light sensitizing drug that is used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). This medicine stays in tumor cells longer than it does in most healthy cells. This targets the tumor cells for laser light therapy. It is used to treat Barrett's esophagus, esophageal cancer, and lung cancer. This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

How to take Photofrin

How should I use this medicine? This drug is given as an injection into a vein. It is administered in a hospital or clinic by a specially trained health care professional.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.
NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.


What should I watch for while using this medicine? This therapy will cause swelling and pain at the site of the tumor with more secretions and mucus in the lungs or throat. Contact your doctor right away if you have trouble breathing or swallowing. Tell your doctor if your symptoms do not go away or if they get worse.

This medicine will make you more sensitive to light. Sunscreens will NOT protect from this new sensitivity. You must avoid exposing skin and eyes to sunlight and bright indoor lights (unshaded light bulbs at close range) for at least 30 days. This medicine stays in the cells of your skin and eyes for 1 to 3 months. You should continue to expose your body to regular light bulb light. Regular exposure to normal indoor lighting will help to breakdown the medicine in your body. The level of light sensitivity will be different for different areas of the body. After 30 days test your skin sensitivity by getting direct sunlight or bright indoor light on a small area of skin for 10 minutes. If there is no skin reaction, no redness, no swelling, no blisters, within 24 hours, you may begin to spend more time in bright light. If a reaction occurs, wait another 2 weeks before trying again.

Your eyes will be more sensitive to light after taking this medicine. Light from the sun, bright lights, or car headlights may bother your eyes. Wear dark sunglasses for at least 30 days after taking this medicine.

Do not become pregnant while taking this medicine. Women should inform their doctor if they wish to become pregnant or think they might be pregnant. There is a potential for serious side effects to an unborn child. Talk to your health care professional or pharmacist for more information. Do not breast-feed an infant while taking this medicine.

What if I miss a dose of Photofrin?

What if I miss a dose? It is important not to miss your dose. Call your doctor or health care professional if you are unable to keep an appointment.

Storing Photofrin


Side Effects of Photofrin

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine? Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:
-allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue
-blisters, redness, swelling of skin (similar to a severe sunburn)
-breathing problems
-changes in vision
-chest or throat pain
-coughing up or vomiting blood
-dark or bloody stools
-fast, irregular heartbeat
-fever
-problems swallowing
-swelling of the ankles, feet, hands
-unusually high or low blood pressure
-unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):
-constipation
-loss of appetite
-nausea, vomiting
-sensitive to the sun and bright lights
-stomach gas, upset This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Interactions with Photofrin

What may interact with this medicine? -alcohol
-allopurinol
-aspirin
-beta-carotene
-bexarotene
-dimethyl sulfoxide
-isotretinoin
-formate
-mannitol
-medicines for blood pressure like amlodipine, felodipine, nifedipine
-medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like warfarin, enoxaparin, and dalteparin
-other medicines that may make you sensitive to the sun like phenothiazines, some medicines for diabetes, thiazide diuretics, griseofulvin, tetracyclines, sulfonamide, and fluoroquinolone antibiotics
-steroid medicines like prednisone or cortisone
-vitamins A and E This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

Precautions

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine? They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
-esophageal fistulas, varices, or ulcers
-porphyria
-recent or ongoing radiation therapy
-tumors that are growing into major blood vessels
-an unusual or allergic reaction to porfimer, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
-pregnant or trying to get pregnant
-breast-feeding

Conditions Commonly Treated by Photofrin

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Prescription prices may vary from pharmacy to pharmacy and are subject to change. The pricing estimates given are based on the most recent information available and may change based on when you actually fill your prescription at the pharmacy. The day supply is based upon the average dispensing patterns or the specific drug and strength. The Program, as well as the prices and the list of covered drugs, can be modified at any time without notice.







More Ways to Save on Photofrin

Buy More, Less Often

If you need to take prescription medication such as Photofrin over an extended period, buying a larger quantity could save you time and money. Many drugs, including Photofrin work out cheaper per pill or dose when purchased in volume. Speak to your doctor about increasing the your prescription and you could pay less for drugs and need fewer trips to the pharmacist.

Compare Pharmacy Prices Online

Drug prices are not regulated, so the price Photofrin of medication may vary significantly between your local pharmacies. Online pharmacy comparison shopping is the simplest way to quickly discover which retailer has the lowest prices for your prescriptions.

Enter the name of your prescription, for example Photofrin, into the search box, add the zip code and click to browse prices and coupon offers. When you have found the cheapest price, print or save the coupon and and take it in to your chosen pharmacy. Comparing prices can save you up to 75 percent on your prescriptions.

Register for a Patient Assistance Program

Patient assistance programs offered by drug manufacturers can help you save money on your prescriptions. Many drug manufacturers have such a program, offering discounts to eligible patients who are prescribed Photofrin. Patients prescribed expensive or branded medication may qualify for discounts through such programs.

Click here to find out more about patient assistance programs.

Explore Generic Drug Options

Photofrin and other branded drugs often have a generic equivalent on the market at a significantly lower price. Generics account for around 8 out of 10 prescriptions filled in the US and are identical their brand name counterparts in quality, safety, strength, dosage form, route of administration, performance characteristics and intended use. Talk to your pharmacist or doctor about safe generic alternatives to your branded prescription.

Check Your Medicare Part D Coverage

Seniors with Medicare Part D may be entitled to discounts on Photofrin and other prescriptions through their policy. The list of drugs covered varies from plan to plan, so check your provider’s website for more information.

Click here to find out more about RxSpark and Medicare Part D.

Explore Other Treatment & Therapy Options

Medication plays a vital role in treating a huge number of conditions, but there may be other therapies, lifestyle changes or surgical options open to you. If you have concerns about prescription costs, or are considering a different approach to your therapy, speak to your doctor to explore alternatives to medication.